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October 7, 2019

ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
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ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Tim Volkmann, a 22-year veteran of intercollegiate athletics, has been named director of RIT Athletics Communications. Volkmann will be responsible for developing the promotional strategy for 24 Tiger sports, as well as administering the day-to-day operations of the Athletics Communications office. He will oversee all communication and public relation functions for a program that consistently competes for league titles and NCAA championships. Volkmann has spent the past six years as the director of athletic communications and media relations at SUNY Geneseo. Read More.

ROBERTS WESLEYAN COLLEGE
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ROBERTS WESLEYAN COLLEGE

Roberts Wesleyan Director of Athletics, Bob Segave has announced the hiring of Obafemi Alao as the newest member of the Redhawks. Alao joins the department as the Assistant Director of Athletics. Alao comes to Roberts after the athletics department was the recipient of the NCAA Division II Strategic Alliance Matching Grant. The grant provided funding for Roberts Wesleyan to hire a full-time assistant director of athletics. The grant is funded by the NCAA Division II diversity grant. Most recently, Alao was the campus athletic director for DSST Public Schools in Denver, Colo. Read More.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE
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WESTMINSTER COLLEGE

Westminster College Director of Athletics Shay Wyatt announced Tammy Ikerd has been hired as the Associate Athletics Director and Senior Woman Administrator. “We’re very pleased to welcome Tammy to Westminster College. Wyatt said. Ikerd joins the Westminster staff after serving for a short time as a County Engagement Specialist at the University of Missouri- Extension and Engagement. Prior to that, Ikerd spent six years at Southern Nazarene University (SNU) in Bethany, Oklahoma as the Associate Athletics Director for Compliance and Senior Woman Administrator. Read More.

KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
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KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY

Jones, recently hired as K-State Athletics’ Assistant Athletics Director of Student-Athlete Development, said it started when he was a basketball manager at Youngstown State in 2011. He became close friends with many players on the team, but he said those friendships went beyond the norm. “I was able to kind of mentor some of the student-athletes there that I worked with,” he said. Jones, who spent two years at Clemson as a graduate assistant/assistant director of student-athlete development, said he looks to have the same type of impact at K-State. Only now, he’s doing it from an experienced lens. “I think it’s really about developing them, holistically, and making sure it’s intentional when we do it, making sure we aren’t just doing things because I think it’s good for them but actually asking them, ‘What do you want?’. Read More.

PAC 12
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PAC 12

On September 30, the Pac-12 released a 135-word statement that expressed its disappointment in the passing of California Senate Bill 206. Stadium obtained the Pac-12’s four key messages via public records request and they were transcribed word-for-word below. The first and fourth messages are predictable from a conference perspective and they were the foundation of the Pac-12’s public statement. The second and third messages, however, are much more enlightening. “Enacting SB 206 would further disadvantage California universities from a competitive and recruiting standpoint.” “Other parts of the country have more resources and parties interested in paying student-athletes, and we would be severely disadvantaged in an open market for student-athletes.” -Andy Wittry, Watch Stadium. Read More.

NCAA
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NCAA

Newly released NCAA records show a Pac-12 president came up with a way to help the NCAA catch schools who fraudulently help student athletes stay eligible and avoid complaints of NCAA enforcement overreach. But his proposal failed after an NCAA committee found little support from athletic conferences. University of Oregon President Michael Schill made the proposal for a panel of university presidents who are not serving on NCAA committees to identify egregious academic fraud. He said having a panel of academics making that decision would address long-standing opposition member schools have had toward letting NCAA officials determining what constitutes academic fraud. But Schill’s proposal didn’t survive. The abandonment of a proposal that puts the decision in the hands of academics shows member schools are worried about more fraud being uncovered on their campuses, says a college athletics expert. -Dan Kane, News Observer. Read More.

OAKLAND UNIVERSITY
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OAKLAND UNIVERSITY

Oakland’s Greg Kampe long has been the lowest-compensated Division I men’s basketball coach in the state of Michigan, despite a more-impressive resume than his mid-major counterparts. His new contract, however, attempts to lessen the gap a bit with a unique clause. The three-year extension, signed April 1, doesn’t increase his base salary by much he’ll now make $301,165 a year, up from the $288,000 at which he started under his previous deal but achievable bonuses could push it closer to $400,000. In his contract, received by The News through a Freedom of Information Act request, there’s something called a “Scheduling Buy Game.” Under this clause, prior to each season, athletic director Steven Waterfield will select one of Oakland’s “guarantee games” or a game in which Oakland is paid a flat fee for traveling to another site, usually at a Power Five program. Whichever game Waterfield picks, Kampe will receive the payout for that game, minus all the program’s expenses, such as travel, hotel and meals. -Tony Paul, The Detroit News. Read More.

October 6, 2019

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH
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UNIVERSITY OF UTAH

The NCAA’s ban on athletes’ making money off the use of their name, likeness and image has been frustrating college student-athletes since the NCAA dubbed them as such in the 1950s to avoid workmen’s compensation claims from injured football players. Those stifling days may soon end, however, shoved toward the brink by a handful of states who have taken matters into their own hands. “It absolutely jeopardizes the amateur model and the collegiate model on a lot of fronts,” Utah State Athletic Director John Hartwell said. “We can’t bury our heads in the sand.” -Julie Jag, The Salt Lake Tribune. Read More.

LOUISIANA
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LOUISIANA

For UL, the Sun Belt Conference is home. At least, for now. But how long it will continue to be, and what the league may look like down the road, is another matter altogether. When he was in New Orleans for the Sun Belt’s preseason football Media Day this summer, Ragin’ Cajuns athletic director Bryan Maggard was asked about his long-term vision of conference affiliation for the NCAA Group of Five program. Is there a point in the next five or 10 years when there is a movement to more of an economically sensible, regionalized approach that would lead to current conferences realigning their membership? “I certainly would be the first to say I don’t think anything like that’s out of the realm of possibility,” Maggard said. “I think as we continue on the pace we’re on, today’s business model is going to be very hard to sustain. It’s even hard for Power 5 programs, to be honest with you.” -Tim Buckley, Lafayette Daily Advertiser. Read More.

BRADLEY UNIVERSITY
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BRADLEY UNIVERSITY

Though California has paved a golden road for student-athlete endorsement deals, Bradley University President Gary Roberts sees possible potholes and wreckage ahead — for Bradley and similar-size schools, along with the entire NCAA. Over NCAA objections, the new law in California will allow college athletes to be paid for the use of their names, images and likenesses — and has prompted other states (including Illinois) to rush to draft comparable legislation. But Roberts, though acknowledging the bill will help a small percentage of powerhouse-school athletes who have been “exploited,” believes such a move nationally could create an even bigger gap in talent between a handful of big schools and everyone else. -Phil Luciano, GateHouse Media Illinois. Read More.

GEORGIA TECH
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GEORGIA TECH

A week after the NCAA levied a postseason ban and scholarship and recruiting restrictions on his team for major NCAA violations that began months into his tenure, Georgia Tech basketball coach Josh Pastner expressed his sorrow for the penalties and, while the NCAA report did not cite him for wrongdoing, recognized that the buck stops at his desk. “I totally understand that fans want us to win more. That’s why I am focused on making sure this team is prepared for this season. Yellow Jacket nation is going to really fall in love with this group. He said that, since the penalties were announced, his team has practiced with enthusiasm. While the NCAA infractions committee recommended that players be permitted to transfer and compete immediately at new schools because of the postseason ban, he said that there had been no indication that any players are considering such a move. -Ken Sugiura, AJC. Read More.

TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY
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TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY

Immediately after announcing this week its intention to become a Division I athletic department, long-time Tarleton State athletic director Lonn Reisman’s phone erupted in calls and texts, including one from TCU. “For years I have had a hard time filling out schedules and I can’t get games; now I’ve got offers from all over,” Reisman said. If all goes according to plan and the NCAA approves it, as expected, Tarleton State will be a Division I school in July of 2020, and a member of the Western Athletic Conference. The WAC plans to sponsor football in the next few years, so initially Tarleton will be an independent DI FCS program. My dearest Tarleton Texans, prepare to spend a ton of money, and hope you can be as lucky as TCU. Expanding your brand, donations and applicants through sports is a risky play, and TCU remains one of the most successful schools in the modern era to do this. -Mac Engel, Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Read More.

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE
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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

The Office of Compliance, Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action at Kent State University in Ohio on Friday announced that its investigation of a situation involving the University of Maine field hockey team did not reveal a Title IX violation or demonstrate gender-related bias. UMaine issued a statement late Friday night expressing university officials’ dissatisfaction with the way Kent State handled its Title IX inquiry. “[We] are disappointed that, according to the summary report, the investigation did not include interviews with the student-athletes who were affected and disrespected by the decisions made on Sept. 7,” the release read. UMaine did not indicate in its statement whether it will consider trying to schedule a field hockey rematch with Temple. -Larry Mahoney, Bangor Daily News. Read More.

SUN BELT CONFERENCE
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SUN BELT CONFERENCE

The signing of the Fair Pay to Play Act in California on Monday — allowing college athletes in the state to profit off their name, image and likeness without repercussion from the NCAA starting in 2023 — caused other states to consider the same decision and jettisoned the NCAA and conferences into fact-finding processes. This is true for the Sun Belt and first-year Commissioner Keith Gill, who spoke with the Journal via phone Friday. The conference has monitored the rapidly evolving discussion throughout the week. Gill said he’s open to the idea of student-athletes earning outside wages, but it will require more research and understanding by all involved. “I think with anything, the devil is in the details to provide any kind of benefit or opportunities to students,” Gill said. -Ethan Joyce, Winston-Salem Journal. Read More.

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS
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UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

Kansas is under a lot of scrutiny these days after recently receiving a Notice of Allegations from the NCAA alleging big rules violations by the basketball team. But it was under the microscope for a different reason Friday night in Lawrence, Kansas, thanks to a performance at the “Late Night in the Phog” kick-off event by legendary rapper Snoop Dogg. In front of 16,300 fans at Allen Fieldhouse, Snoop closed out the night by performing apparently unedited versions of several hits, including “Gin and Juice,” “The Next Episode” and “Drop It Like It’s Hot,” replete with a team of dancers using poles. He wore a Kansas jersey with “Snoop” on the back and even shot (fake) money into the crowd. ESPN reported that the fake $100 bills featured the rapper’s own face. Afterward, Kansas athletics director Jeff Long apologized for the whole thing via a statement. -Jace Evans, USA TODAY. Read More.

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
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UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

A federal judge has ordered the University of Arizona to produce investigative files related to 16 complaints of domestic violence, sexual assault or sexual harassment in the athletic department, as part of an ongoing lawsuit involving former Wildcats running back Orlando Bradford’s abuse of women. Judge Susan R. Bolton ordered the UA to produce the files, but denied the plaintiff’s request for additional sanctions, including attorneys’ fees. The plaintiff said the UA withheld critical evidence in the case, and that the university’s omission called into question many of the statements already made during the discovery process. -Caitlin Schmidt, Arizona Daily Star. Read More.

October 4, 2019

USC
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USC

A San Francisco vintner was sentenced to serve five months in prison Friday afternoon after he admitted paying $100,000 and agreeing to pay $200,000 more to have his daughter fraudulently recruited by the University of Southern California’s water polo team. Agustin Francisco Huneeus, 53, was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Boston after he entered guilty pleas to charges of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and honest services mail fraud. Huneeus will also serve two years of supervised release following his prison term and pay a fine of $100,000. According to prosecutors, Huneeus entered into an agreement with William “Rick” Singer to have his daughter’s SAT scores fraudulently inflated by having the daughter take the test at a West Hollywood facility controlled by Singer and a corrupt administrator. Later, Singer sent the girl’s application and supporting material, including a fabricated athletic profile and photographs of the girl in a pool made to look like she was playing water polo, to USC’s Senior Athletic Director Donna Heinel. – Dave Canton, Mass Live, Read More

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON
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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

Oregon athletic director Rob Mullens shot down the idea of 10 a.m. kickoff at Autzen Stadium in football next season, saying, “It’s one of those things we’re all trying to figure out. For us, I’ve heard from our fans and I’ve heard from our student-athletes — it’s not likely. We’re always going to keep an open mind on things we can consider to help us meet our goals. At this point, it would only be opt-in and we’re not opt-in.” On the new California law and similar legislation to pay athletes, Mullens stated, “I’m hopeful we can come up with a national solution. The NCAA does have a name, image and likeness working group. We probably need to try hit the accelerator some on that. As a larger organization, nimbleness is not our strength so we probably need to keep that moving at a pace that works for everybody.” – John Canzano, The Oregonian/OregonLive, Read More

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA
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UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA

St. Thomas has been invited to join the NCAA Division-I Summit League, pending NCAA approval, giving St. Thomas a waiver to go directly from Division III to Division I. The Tommies were recently “involuntary removed” from the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and could stay in the league through the spring of 2021. College hockey sources told the Herald that St. Thomas has already had high-level discussions about future conference affiliation for its hockey programs. UND athletic director Bill Chaves, whose men’s hockey team plays in the National Collegiate Hockey Conference, told the Herald that he hasn’t been a part of “any conversations with that type of situation.” The Star Tribune reported that St. Thomas will look at either the nonscholarship Pioneer League or the Missouri Valley Football Conference for a football home. Chaves said the athletic directors were not as involved as the presidents in the St. Thomas move. “It really has been a conversation with the commissioner and the presidents,” Chaves said. “We’ve been apprised of the situation, but at the end of the day, it was a presidential decision that they felt (St. Thomas) could make a good member. They still have some work to do with the NCAA.” – Brad Elliott Schlossman, Grand Forks Herald, Read More

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY
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NIAGARA UNIVERSITY

Niagara University ice hockey coach Jason Lammers has received a contract extension through the 2023-24 season, the school announced Friday. “In just two years, Jason’s integrity, passion, and skill has established him as a leader on our campus, in our conference, and throughout the Niagara community,” Athletic Director Simon Gray said in a statement. “His dedication to recruiting and developing the highest-caliber student-athletes has raised our hockey program’s on-ice competitiveness and academic outcomes. From day one, Jason has inspired with his vision for what Purple Eagles hockey can provide Niagara University and I am elated at this mutual commitment to his leadership.” – The Buffalo News, Read More

SPORTS MEDIA
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SPORTS MEDIA

As part of the Conference USA rights deals announced in March 2018, rights partners CBS and Stadium are both producing some games that will only air on Facebook. One of those CBS games sees Middle Tennessee State hosting Marshall on Saturday, and CBS is taking an unusual approach to broadcasting it. The Facebook games don’t have traditional commercials, so something else has to be used to fill that space, and CBS decided to use that to showcase a behind-the-scenes look at the broadcast. The CBS statement read, “During stoppages in play – when traditionally a telecast would go to commercial – sideline reporter John Schriffen will take viewers on virtual tours of the game production truck, showcasing the ins-and-outs, different responsibilities of those in the game truck and how decisions are made.” – Andrew Bucholtz, Awful Announcing, Read More 

CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
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CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

The Chippewa Champions Center is a bold step forward for Central Michigan University, its students and its alumni. The center features over 50,000 square feet dedicated to student-athlete excellence, a 7,000 square foot, state-of-the-art human performance center, more than 7,100 square feet of office and meeting space, and a 4,200 square foot football locker room. The facility fills a campus need for meeting and event space that will be available to faculty, staff and students. Advancement efforts will be enhanced by the facility with the hospitality spaces supporting these efforts year-round. It will provide CMU a marquee location to rally the immense pride of our alumni and turn it into revenue that will support all of our colleges and student success programs. – Read More

NCAA
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NCAA

Merl Code was sentenced to three months behind bars Friday for his role in the NCAA bribery scandal — after his lawyer railed that the government’s protracted investigation into corruption in college basketball failed to ensnare any bigwigs. Code, who will remain out on bail pending appeal, was convicted of bribery conspiracy earlier this year alongside aspiring sports business manager Christian Dawkins. Jurors found the two guilty of bribing college basketball assistant coaches to steer promising hoopsters to Dawkins’ company. – Emily Saul, New York Post, Read More

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY
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KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

An internal investigation into Kent State’s decision to stop a field hockey game from heading into double overtime so the school could set off fireworks before its Sept. 7 home football game found no Title IX violations or gender-related bias, according to a prepared statement Friday from university president Todd Diacon. The internal investigation was completed by Kent State’s Office of Compliance, Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action. Temple and No. 24 Maine were scoreless and heading into double overtime on a field near the football stadium last month when Kent State officials ended the game because of the fire marshal regulations for the scheduled daytime fireworks. The teams had been informed of the timing issues before they started play. – Heather Dinich, ESPN, Read More

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
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UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA

Carolina Athletics and the Rams Club announced an initiative to celebrate and promote the university’s women’s athletics at the school on Friday. The initiative, called ForevHER, will champion the accomplishments made by UNC 15 women’s athletics programs while aiming to empower student-athletes, improve their resources and inspire the Carolina community. One of the first actions under the initiative will be the launch of a new fundraising campaign. The goal is to raise $100 million to improve various programs’ facilities, scholarship support, and mentorship programs. Beyond emphasizing on-field success, the ForevHER initiative also aims to create a network between UNC athlete alumnae, current student-athletes, and Rams Club members. The goal is to provide resources and mentorship to young student-athletes as they grow within the athletic program and university.- Brighton McConnell, Chapelboro, Read More

ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
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ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY

Arkansas State University is seeking an assistant director of compliance. The Assistant Director of Compliance is responsible for conducting special research studies, analyzing data, preparing statistics, making recommendations based on research findings, and monitoring and coordinating project/program activities. This position is governed by state and federal laws and agency/institution policy. –NCAA. Apply Here.

GEORGIA TECH
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GEORGIA TECH

As has often been the case in coach Geoff Collins’ 10-month tenure, Georgia Tech will try something new Saturday. For their home game against North Carolina, the Yellow Jackets will be dressed in all-gray uniforms, in what is believed to be a first. As they take Grant Field, Tech’s four game captains will have gold superhero capes draped over their shoulders in what most definitely will be a first. In an unlikely triangulation of objectives, Tech’s alternate uniforms will pay homage to team history, honor some of Atlanta’s bravest children and take a plunge into the river of swag. It will be the team’s most boundary-pushing ensemble since Tech’s partnership with Adidas began in July 2018. -Ken Sugiura, AJC. Read More.

UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS
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UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS

New Memphis athletic director Laird Veatch conducted a wide-ranging interview with The Commercial Appeal on Tuesday. Here, though, are more highlights from Veatch, including his initial thoughts on the name, image and likeness debate dominating the national college sports conversation at the moment, his strategy dealing with the investigation into the Memphis women’s basketball program and his view on the viability of Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium moving forward. “I have to be the most junior athletic director in the country as of now, so I should not be a voice for where this is headed other than to say it’s absolutely concerning.” ” Although I am, just like everyone else, concerned about what that could mean to the collegiate model. And not only to the student-athletes that would directly be associated with name, image and likeness, but the impact to other sports and what this leads to big picture down the road.” -Mark Giannotto, Memphis Commercial Appeal. Read More.

NCAA
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NCAA

As arguments get fully joined over a possible next step in compensating college athletes — allowing them to make money from their name, image and likeness — the ledger finally is being closed on a previous step that was equally contentious. Checks worth thousands of dollars, in some cases more than $20,000, have been arriving this week in the mailboxes of current and former athletes who played in the years just before schools were allowed to offer scholarships based on the full cost of attending college. The money is from the $208.7 million settlement of one part of a lawsuit against the NCAA and 11 major conferences concerning the association’s athlete-compensation limits. The other part of the lawsuit, which seeks an injunction against the current compensation limits, has been appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. -Steve Berkowitz and Jori Epstein, USA TODAY. Read More.

HOWARD UNIVERSITY
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HOWARD UNIVERSITY

Earlier this week, Caylin Newton, brother of 2010 Heisman Trophy winner, announced on Twitter that he had decided to transfer from Howard. A day later, a report surfaced in which Howard’s head coach, Ron Prince, was accused by anonymous parents of harassing, bullying and verbally and mentally abusing his football players since he arrived at the program this past offseason. In a letter sent to not only the university’s president and athletic director but also to the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference as well as the NCAA, one parent acknowledged that while these are currently just allegations, they sincerely hope that there is an investigation. At the time of our posting, the university had not yet responded to CFT’s emailed request for a comment on the accusations; subsequent to that, we did receive a response confirming that the allegations are being investigated. -John Taylor, NBCSports. Read More.


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