You Don’t Need The NFL Draft To Prove You’re A Player’s Coach

April 27th, 2017 | by Matthew Monte
You Don’t Need The NFL Draft To Prove You’re A Player’s Coach
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NFL Draft

The NFL Draft is tonight, and while 87% of football programs in this country won’t have a player selected, there still might be a reason to pay attention.

For college programs, especially the ones with players being selected in the first round, the draft is all about brand building. It’s showing off the fruits of your labor on a more individualized level. Only one team can win a national title each year, but 32 get a chance at claiming a first round pick. And your school doesn’t even need to produce one of those picks to improve your image.

More and more, programs are highlighting the involvement of their coaches in developing top draft prospects, and while it can serve as a boon for recruiting, it can also go a long way to establishing a coach’s image.

Matt Rhule is the perfect example of this. Rhule left a program that he had elevated at Temple to take over the embattled Baylor program. Rhule has a reputation os one of the “good guys,” he’s “a player’s coach.”

Rhule left a program that he had elevated at Temple to take over the embattled Baylor program. Rhule has a reputation os one of the “good guys.” He’s “a player’s coach,” and if you’ve ever questioned what that really meant, consider that he’ll be attending the NFL Draft, not with any Baylor athletes, but with one of his Temple players. Despite Rhule moving on to a new program, Temple defensive end Haason Reddick decided to invite his former coach to sit with him as he waits for his name to be called. Reddick is projected as the number thirteen prospect in the draft.


Although no Baylor players are projected to go in the first two rounds, the university stands to benefit from the site of their coach hugging one of his former players on national television. It’s a great look for all involved.

Going beyond the optics and obvious leverage in recruiting, this says a lot about Rhule and the impact he’s had on his players. It’s not uncommon for athletes to show their coaches love no matter where they end up but being asked to join a former player, less than a year after leaving for greener pastures, on one of the most important days of their life, that is uncommon.

There is value in being a “player’s coach.” Even if you’re never sitting in the front row at the NFL Draft, recruits will see the loyalty from current and former players, and there is no better advantage than that.

About Contributor Matthew Monte
Matthew Monte is Managing Editor of College AD and formerly Co-Managing Editor of Underdog Dynasty. He is a graduate of The B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration at UL Lafayette, mostly because it didn't require a foreign language. Matt is also a recovering stand up comedian who occasionally relapses.

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